Beliefs and History

Our Beliefs


The Christian Church
The Christian Church is made up of those who have been baptized and have received Christ. It is through Christ that we are directed to God’s love that makes us new and different people. Lutherans believe that they are a part of a community of faith that began with the gift of the Holy Spirit, or God’s presence in people, on the day of Pentecost. The church, regardless of the external form it takes, is the fellowship of those who have been restored to God by Christ. To be called into fellowship with Christ is also to be called into community with other believers.

The church is essential to Christian life and growth. Its members are all sinners in need of God’s grace. It has no claim on human perfection. The church exists solely for the hearing and doing of God’s Word. It can justify its existence only when it proclaims the living Word of Christ, administers the Sacraments and gives itself to the world in deeds of service and love. Most Lutheran Christians recognize a wider fellowship of churches and are eager to work alongside them in ecumenical ministries and projects.




The Lutheran Church

Martin Luther (b. November 10, 1483, in Eisleben, Germany, d. February 18, 1546 in Eisleben) is known as the Father of Protestantism. He had studied to become a lawyer before becoming an Augustinian monk in 1505, and was ordained a priest in 1507. While continuing his studies in pursuit of a Doctor of Theology degree, he discovered significant differences between what he read in the Bible and the theology and practices of the church. On October 31, 1517, he posted a challenge on the church door at Wittenberg University to debate 95 theological issues. Luther’s hope was that the church would reform its practice and preaching to be more consistent with the Word of God as contained in the Bible.

What started as an academic debate escalated to a religious war, fueled by fiery temperaments and violent language on both sides. As a result, there was not a reformation of the church but a separation. “Lutheran” was a name applied to Luther and his followers as an insult but adopted as a badge of honor by them instead.

Lutheran Christians still celebrate the Reformation on October 31 and still hold to the basic principles of theology and practice espoused by Luther.

For more information about the Lutheran Church visit What we Believe on the ELCA  home page.


September 25, 2017 Butterfly Christian Preschool